A Blog on Christian Leadership & Cultural Engagement

Thinking Theologically About Sex

by Mikel Del Rosario on September 9, 2014

How does sexual intimacy reflect God?

While popular culture can seem to be fixated on sex, it seems the connection between this profound gift and the God who created it is rarely considered—even in the context of a church community.

On an episode of the Table Podcast, Dr. Darrell Bock, Dr. Gary Barnes, and Debby Wade discuss a biblical view of sexual intimacy, considering what it reveals about its ultimate Designer. How can we think theologically about sexual intimacy? Dr. Barnes notes:

We all have this God reflective thing going on with sexuality…We're actually key participants in it. But even the experience of sexuality is not primarily about us…It's elevated above us...

He warns against the temptation to either glorify sex or denigrate it in our conversations. Rather, we need to consider sexuality a sacred thing that is reflective of God. Dr. Bock agrees, emphasizing the sacredness of God’s design for intimacy between and husband and wife:

When we say that sexuality is sacred, part of what we're saying is: “It's set apart. It's sanctified. It's special”…because the exchange that takes place in sexuality is a uniquely intimate thing that's going on. People may pretend it's casual, but it's not.

In this video clip, Wade explains how sexual intimacy not only reflects God, but even serves as a profound illustration of His loving pursuit of humankind. Barnes and Bock respond by suggesting that this metaphor also informs our understanding of the Trinity. Watch this section of the conversation here:

While the popular culture tends to focus on the physical aspect of sexuality, this unhealthy emphasis tends to miss the profound spiritual dimension which involves God and points us to Him. Thinking theologically about sexual intimacy elevates the conversation, reveals the specialness of the gift, and even allows us a greater awareness of God.

Listen to the rest of this podcast: A Biblical View of Sexual Intimacy